In the beginning there was grad school. That ended in 2010. Now what do I blog about?

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September 03, 2008

making up is hard to do

Not happy with my summer class, as you can see by reading this summer posts. Was given a B+. I am fighting it. I want an A, and she said she'll give me an A- if I can submit another paper on diversity prior to the due date for final grades. I have a draft done - 8 pages - which I will edit today and get in to her before Friday morning.

Yes, I can be a high-maintenance student. I am a high achiever. I realize this. But honestly, the final paper assignment included a section which specifically asked for an 'action plan' i.e. a way I would incorporate diversity and cultural awareness in the classroom. Before writing the paper I emailed the prof and repeated for the umpteenth time 'I AM NOT A K-12 TEACHER!' and asked for guidance on how to meet the assignment requirements. She didn't give me any clear answer. So I did the best I could and sent it on in. Then she grades my paper with comments along the lines of 'there is no action plan here' and 'the first half starts out strong but then loses focus'. Really? Hmm.

I then began to suspect she has a TA managing the class assignments because the prof doesn't seem to have a clue as to what I do for work, even though I had to mention it in pretty much every discussion so that my classmates would understand where I was coming from with my discussions. Either that or she was unable to veer away from the course outline & assignment rubrics to make slight modifications for my situation. I believe these things could have been tweaked for my situation. (and I find it hard to believe she hasn't had someone else from higher ed in her class before.)

So I have written a lengthy paper on diversity training in medical school. If I edit the text down to the 3-5 pages she wants, the may be two pages worth of footnotes explaining what PPS and LPP is. So be it. I am trying to make it work the best I can.

Lesson learned: contact the prof BEFORE the class starts and make sure he/she understands where I am coming from and why I am taking his/her class. I'll do this for the fall term and see if it works out better. I know someone who works here at my U who is in an MEd program at another big-U (I go to a state college for my MEd) and she has the same problems with profs not seeming to understand why she is in an MEd program if she isn't a K-12 teacher. So its not just me and that makes me feel better.

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